Thursday, March 22, 2007

Coersion

Yesterday we learned about the Shaolin, warrior monks, Zen Buddhism, and stuff like that. Too many visitors today! Chatting and socialising is absolutely exhausting! It can also be very enlightening. JC talked about his experience of the WW2 - he was around DJ's age at the time...

On the News
Learning drop-outs could be fined "Teenagers who drop out of school at 16 and refuse any further education will face fines or prosecution under new plans to raise the leaving age."

Criminalising drop-outs 'wrong'
"Criminalising youngsters who fail to stay on in education or training until they reach the age of 18 is the wrong approach, say teaching unions."

Child 'judges' to sentence peers "Nacro chief executive Paul Cavadino said: Being judged by other young people can have a far more positive and long-lasting effect than feeling targeted by the authorities."

Mahatma Gandhi stated, "Every action that is dictated by fear or by coercion of any kind ceases to be moral." He also said: "Coercion cannot but result in chaos in the end....One who uses coercion is guilty of deliberate violence. Coercion is inhuman...."

Today's Quotes
Is it a right or a duty in society to take care of their infant members in opposition to the will of the parent? How far does this right and duty extend? --to guard the life of the infant, his property, his instruction, his morals? ... we draw a line, but where? --public sentiment does not seem to have traced it precisely... It is better to tolerate the rare instance of a parent refusing to let his child be educated, than to shock the common feelings and ideas by the forcible asportation* and education of the infant against the will of the father... What is proposed... is to remove the objection of expense, by offering education gratis, and to strengthen parental excitement by the disfranchisement of his child while uneducated... If we do not force instruction, let us at least strengthen the motives to receive it when offered. - Thomas Jefferson

(*asportation means removal, and disfranchisement means deprivation of privileges of citizenship - I just learned that!)

It is a very grave mistake to think that the enjoyment of seeing and searching can be promoted by means of coercion and a sense of duty. - Albert Einstein

Today's Links
Art Pad
My Wonderful World

2 comments:

Gill said...

That's a fascinating Jefferson quote. The Gandhi one is good too, but the Jefferson one was a complete surprise to me.

I thought you were going to tell us about the Shaolin and coercion, when I read the first sentence! I suspect the Shaolin is a perfect example of excellence and self-discipline resulting from autonomy, because surely no-one is compelled to be there.

Tibetan Star said...

You've changed your photo!

I really struggle with titles... mainly because my posts tend to cover unrelated stuff - could that be the effect of prolonged schooling? ;-)