Thursday, March 15, 2007

Conversations

We came across the notion of 'educational abuse' some time ago and had an interesting discussion around this. DJ's immediate reaction was that "School is a form of educational abuse, not home-education!" I remembered Prof. MacBeath telling journalists, in School inclusion 'can be abuse', that "Physically sitting in a classroom is not inclusion. You might call it a form of abuse, in a sense, that those children are in a situation that's totally inappropriate for them." DJ smiled and continued: "This cold is 'healthly-abusing' my body!"

Anyway, personal financial educational continues! We went to the bank and got the application form in so DJ is now anxiously waiting for his card! He also got a couple of games he had been wanting for quite a while.

On the way back we got talking about the power of thought and how everything we do starts up that way, as a little thought, often as a wish or, in other words, a 'wanting-thought' - and how these are the things which motivate us into action. And where do 'wanting-thought' come from? Well, for us, 'free from peer-pressure aspies' who couldn't care less about 'keeping up with the Joneses', it comes directly from our conscious or unconscious needs. Those of us who are fortunate enough to be consciously aware of the needs that are driving us into action are freer in the sense that we can come up with different strategies to fulfil them. However, that requires an advanced level of self-awareness - which we are working on... For example, if DJ gets fixated on something, I might ask him what need of his is being fulfilled by that 'something' - so far he has always been fully aware of that - and then 'in what other ways might that specific need be fulfilled'. This is where the fun really begins, as we need to engage our creative, inventive minds.

Another little chat we had, prompted by Lucy and Allie, was about success. I said something like 'If you had achieved something that someone else - your parents, your teachers, the government, society, etc - had decided for you, based on their views on what's best for you, would that make you a success?' to which DJ promptly replied 'No, it would just mean that I would have done something somebody else wanted me to do.' That got us trying to clarify our own definition of success, and although this is still 'work in progress', we've at least decided on some of its absolutely essential defining characteristics - self-determination and autonomy! For us, success implies the freedom to choose our own goals, the freedom to choose which path to follow in order to achieve them, and an awareness that there is a multitude of equally valid goals to choose from.

What else? Last night we enjoyed The Grumpy Guide to Art and found it a fun introduction to art movements like the pre-raphaelites, surrealism, cubism, and abstract expressionism. We also got some good tips on talking art bollocks!

Home-Ed On The News
Why we didn't send our children to school
"Earlier this week Education Editor Abbie Wightwick revealed that the Welsh Assembly Government may monitor home education more closely. Here parents tell her why they decided against sending their children to school."

Today's Link: Read It Swap It

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