Wednesday, April 04, 2007

A poem

THE RELIGION OF SECULARISM by Christopher Titmuss

1. Science is the God of secular religion. Science has the power to solve all problems and has the potential to answer to all prayers.

2. Secularists worship career, money, pleasure and sex. Nirvana is getting what I want whenever I want. 'I' 'me' and 'my' matters above everything else. Secularists believe they are living in the real world.

3. Recreational drugs and alcohol are the bread and wine of secular beliefs.

4. Self-help books are the Bibles and Koran of secular culture. Psychotherapists, counsellors and astrologers are the priests of the religion of secularism. [Here I'd say: so-called experts and professionals are the new priests!]

5. Entertainers, fashion models, film stars, and sports stars are the Gods and Goddesses of secular religion. The television set is the sacred shrine at home to watch in attentive silence.

6. The faithful gather to worship their Gods and Goddesses at concerts, cinemas and sports stadiums. The faithful revere the Chosen Ones of secular religion.

7. The followers of secular religion make their annual pilgrimage to exotic resorts to worship sun, sea and sand.

8. The shopping mall is the Kingdom of Heaven. Money is the way to the Kingdom of Heaven - homo shopiens instead of homo sapiens.

9. The university is the Temple of Knowledge - the way to the Promised Land of personal success and prosperity. Knowledge, sustained effort and a competitive attitude are the means to success.

10. Secularists believe production, consumption and collection of goods is a primary reason for existence. Secularists believe in ownership and wealth as the great goal of existence – human having instead of human being.

4 comments:

ballastexistenz said...

I know a lot of people who are agnostics or atheists or secular humanists and so forth and they are nothing like that.

health watch center said...

Hello Star...

How are you doing? Well I am a new reader of your blog and have found this blog very interesting thanks for sharing...

This poem by Christopher is interesting...

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Gill said...

Blimey - I definitely recognise myself in a lot of that list :oops:

Tibetan Star said...

I went to a couple of the poem's author talks and was quite impressed. His talks are really powerful and genuine.

After that I realized I had read one of his books, just before starting our home-educating journey, and feeling quite inspired by this words then.

I'll make a new post with an excerpt of the introduction, which he titled What The School Taught,
What The Enlightened One Taught, where he remembers his time at school.

"I was lucky enough to leave school at the age of fifteen and never to go back. I left school without a single qualification. It seemed to me then that school endeavoured to minimise one's enjoyment of life, of fun and play. It wasn't worth the sacrifice.
...
I still have the sympathy for that expression of extreme thought which says we only stop learning when we go to school. I greatly appreciate the immense significance of education...Education is a marvellous and indispensable tool for inner development but I believe it still remains often out of touch with the depths of inner experience and the wisdom of the heart. The Latin word educat means 'to lead out', 'to bring out'. Whether schools truly fulfill that mission is questionabvle.
It was rather ironic that thirty years after leaving school, I was invited to speak at a conference on th Phylosophy of the Future of Humanity at Cambridge University. There I expressed the view that education easily abuses the mind through imposing on it too many demands to absorb knowledge, to be clever, to be ruthlessly self-interested. The desire to add letters before and after one's name seems to imply that students are not satisfied with the number of letters in their name! To live wisely and intelligently requires a deep, meditative re-examination of priorities. Without this inquiry, we will go on demanding more and more from the minds of the young to force them to fit into the objectives of the private and public sector."